someday I'll get the hang of this

First thing you should know: this blog follows no rhyme nor reason. Some of the madness includes things from books I read and tv shows or movies I watch. Those currently include books by Tamora Pierce, George RR Martin, and many of the BBC's television shows. Sometimes I interrupt the fan-posts with real life things that are important.
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exlibrisfangirl:

The BBC Robin Hood Version (Part 1 of ?)

the-history-of-fighting:

 Annoying Arrows 

An arrow hit on a lightly armored or unarmored person might knock them off their feet. Trying to continue doing anything with an arrow sticking out of you is difficult at best, although whether your problem is just agonising pain or your body going into shock (‘freezing up’) at the injury depends on where and to what depth the arrow is lodged.
Attempting to pull out an arrow will only make things worse - historically, arrowheads were not firmly adhered to their shafts. Sometimes they were attached with a blob of candlewax, but usually the archers would simply spit on the shaft before sticking the head on - thus, snapping the shaft (a lot more difficult than Hollywood makes it look, as they were made from the hardest woods available so they would fly further and straighter), was completely pointless, as pulling on the shaft would leave the arrowhead inside the wound.
The only way to remove one was to widen the wound, either with a knife or by wiggling it around. And as archers would usually stick a number of arrows in the dirt at their feet in preparation for firing them, arrow wounds had a strong tendency to become badly infected. The only way to deal with an arrow quickly was to push it through until the head came out the other side. A hit from an arrow was never Only a Flesh Wound.
Full Article: tvtropes.org

the-history-of-fighting:

Annoying Arrows

An arrow hit on a lightly armored or unarmored person might knock them off their feet. Trying to continue doing anything with an arrow sticking out of you is difficult at best, although whether your problem is just agonising pain or your body going into shock (‘freezing up’) at the injury depends on where and to what depth the arrow is lodged.

Attempting to pull out an arrow will only make things worse - historically, arrowheads were not firmly adhered to their shafts. Sometimes they were attached with a blob of candlewax, but usually the archers would simply spit on the shaft before sticking the head on - thus, snapping the shaft (a lot more difficult than Hollywood makes it look, as they were made from the hardest woods available so they would fly further and straighter), was completely pointless, as pulling on the shaft would leave the arrowhead inside the wound.

The only way to remove one was to widen the wound, either with a knife or by wiggling it around. And as archers would usually stick a number of arrows in the dirt at their feet in preparation for firing them, arrow wounds had a strong tendency to become badly infected. The only way to deal with an arrow quickly was to push it through until the head came out the other side. A hit from an arrow was never Only a Flesh Wound.

Full Article: tvtropes.org

(via yellowis4happy)

xaevryn-qg:

OC histories more like

image

It is the very error of the moon;
She comes more nearer earth than she was wont,
And makes men mad.
Othello (Othello, Act V scene ii)

(via dailyshakespeare)

Okay but I’ve been thinking about Shakespeare a lot (surprise). Romeo and Juliet in particular since I wanted to figure out what Romeo did to Tybalt that pissed him off so much. Just general character research for my one scene as Romeo.

And I realized: Tybalt is pissed at Romeo for the ENTIRE PLAY because ROMEO SHOWED UP TO THE CAPULET PARTY. That’s it. There’s no textual evidence for anything else. Tybalt thinks Romeo came to mock them at their own party and HE DECIDES TO KILL ROMEO FOR IT.

Which, for the scene we perform, it’s very telling and does give me some solid ground to stand on when I say “I never injured thee” because what the hell, Tybalt, I wore a mask and Mercutio (cousin of the prince, who way outranks you) said I could come- practically dragged me here.

But is also presents some interesting thoughts. Because why would Tybalt be so pissed about Romeo just being there? Yes, there’s the feud. And yes, Tybalt has some pretty strict ideas about honor and pride and what the hell you are not supposed to do. But Romeo is some teenaged lovesick layabout. What threat is he, really?

It got me thinking that either Tybalt is really the irrational, hotheaded character he seems to be, or Romeo is much less innocent that he seems. What if Tybalt has good reason (other than Romeo’s last name) to not want Romeo within a hundred feet of his home? What would cause the King of Cats to have such a reaction? It’s these sorts of questions that make me want to write stories about secondary characters that sort of set the known narrative on it’s head.

fytortall:

I was listening to First Test today, and I got to the part where Kel is rushing out to serve Lord Wyldon, but she trips and falls on oil that someone put there, so she has to change and is late. Kel merely changes her clothes and starts leaving out her window, but I started thinking about how Alanna would have reacted.

And now I’ve spent all day thinking about how the series’ would be different if they were switched; what if Kel had disguised herself as a boy and Alanna was the first female page?

I can’t think about anything else.

Kel goes to court as Kal and meets George and Jon and Gary and everybody else, but is completely uninterested romantically, so there isn’t a love triangle. But everybody loves her for her completely straight faced reactions to everything accompanied by sardonic remarks. Kel fights Ralon because bullies. Kel playing chess and making fun of Myles. Kel going with Jon to fight the Ysandir because she knows he can’t do it by himself. Duke Roger not knowing what to do because he can’t tell what she thinks of him. Kel becoming the Woman Who Ride Like a Man, but making the changes easier because she knows about the complications in cultures clashing. Kel confusing Wyldon with her level-headedness as he tries to pick fights.

Alanna responding to sexist comments with witty comebacks. Alanna making friends with Eda Bell. Alanna getting into fights with Peachblossom and shouting at her stubborn horse in the stables. Alanna and Neal bickering constantly. Kel taking Neal as her squire. Neal mouthing off but then being cowed by Kel’s stone face and constant vegetables. Alanna fighting all the conservatives in tournaments. Alanna raising the griffin. Alanna having to deal with all the people and babies in Haven. Alanna hunting down Blayce with incoherent fury.

I realize many of the circumstances would not actually occur, as Kel is not a mage and other differences, but I am just so amused.

(via yellowis4happy)

This selfie turned out to be amazing so other people must see it.

buckybarneswho:

Let’s be honest everyone would rather watch a Black Widow movie than antman

(via bisexualmargaerytyrell)

I’m rewatching Game of Thrones while sewing and I JUST REALIZED WHAT EPISODE THIS IS. FUCK THIS SHADOW BABY AND HIS CREEPY ASS. NO WAY.

Asker xaevryn Asks:
Outlander, not Highlander. Two very different things. Do not make the mistakes that I have made.
whimsyfits whimsyfits Said:

Good gracious thank you. Like a guardian angel for tv shows. <3

jesus h. roosevelt christ!

               no sassenech, just me.

(via hawkeyeed)

I almost started cutting fabric without washing it first. What the hell was I thinking.

wordstudio:

bycrom:

By Crom! is my joke-a-panel autobiographical comic featuring life advice and spiritual guidance from Conan the Barbarian. It ran from January 2012 to May 2014, and is collected in two books, The Collected By Crom! and Full Colour Cromulence. You can read the archives on WealdComics.com, and grab the books in print and in PDF.

By Crom! will be tabling with Weald Comics at TCAF, VanCAF, TAAFI and possibly FanExpo Toronto!

Rachel Kahn’s By Crom! series isn’t only funny, though it is funny, it is also charming and comforting and challenging, panel by panel, in great ways. Get thee this comic.

(via professorsparklepants)